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CST 1101

This guide is intended for students in CST 1101. It will give you suggestions on how to conduct basic research using the library's resources.

Evaluating Internet Sources - RECAP

RECAP

When doing research, including on the internet, you need to be sure that you find reliable sources. For each source that you find, be sure to perform the checks on this list to confirm that your source is one that you can use and refer to in your research project.

 

Relevance: Is the information relevant to your needs?

  • Does the source help you research your topic and/or answer your questions?
  • Does the source meet the requirements of your assignment?

Expertise: Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor?

  • Is the author qualified or an expert who knows about the topic?
  • Is there information about the author(s) on the website/web page?

Currency: How up to date is your information?

  • How old is the source, when was it published?
  • Does the website get its information from up-to-date sources, and how recently was it updated?

Accuracy: Is your source’s information reliable and truthful?

  • Does the source state where its information comes from?
  • Can you verify any of the information by checking other sources?

Purpose: Why was your information source created?

  • Is your source designed to educate, entertain, or to make money?
  • Is the source designed to further a political, religious, or institutional cause or bias?

The Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus

Ever hear of the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus?

Think about it: Does this animal exist? Why or why not?

Using RECAP, what are some red flags that doubts the information found on this website?